Inside A Colony: The Birth Of A Bee

Inside A Colony: The Birth Of A Bee

I’ve been locked up in this cell for three weeks now and my legs are cramped and uncomfortable. At first, I was lying in the bottom of a waxen vault, wrapped in a tiny egg. Then gradually, my protective coating just dissolved and there I was, sitting in my breakfast. All around me was hustle and bustle, nurses tending me night and day, and all I did was eat!

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Why Keep Honey Bees?

Why Keep Honey Bees?

Most people begin keeping bees for the honey. After all, nothing compares to the sweet taste of the glistening liquid, warm and fragrant from the hive. But people stay in beekeeping year after year for other reasons. In fact, honey may drop lower and lower on the list while the fascination with honey bees spirals forever upward.

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Not All Beeswax Is The Same

Not All Beeswax Is The Same

Not all beeswax is the same, as beeswax can vary significantly depending on country, forage, bee species and cleaning processes. Also, each country also grades beeswax differently.

 

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Where Will You Put Your Hive?

Where Will You Put Your Hive?

You’ve painted your hive and ordered your bees. You are eager to get started with your new hobby, but you still haven’t decided where to put your hive. Should it go near the house? Next to the fence? Behind the garage?

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We've Been Beekeeping For At Least 9,000 Years

Photo credit: A hollow log hive of the Cévennes (France) reveals the details of circular comb architecture in Apis mellifera. Eric Tourneret

Stone Age rock art, as well as ancient Egyptian iconography dating back to 2400 BCE, has hinted at our millennia-long partnership with honeybees, Apis mellifera. And now, researchers studying thousands of pottery fragments have discovered that Neolithic Old World farmers were harvesting bee products 9,000 years ago. The findings, published in Nature, suggest our close association goes back to the beginnings of agriculture.

When the glaciers retreated at the end of the last ice age, European honeybee populations were finally able to expand northwards. Yet in the fossil record, honeybees have been ecologically invisible for most of the last 10,000 years. In that time, Neolithic agriculture emerged and spread out of southeastern Anatolia and the Levant (modern day eastern Mediterranean), and humans moved into areas that were well suited for honeybees too. Also, clearing up woodlands would have brought in light-demanding herbs and fruit trees, which may have offered an added positive effect. And where there’s honeybees, there’s honey and beeswax. The latter has many technological, ritual, cosmetic, and medicinal purposes.

Since beeswax consists of a complex suite of lipids with a composition that stays highly constant, it acts as a chemical fingerprint on archaeological artifacts. Beeswax residue on pottery could be the result of cooking with honey or from processing wax combs. It’s also been used as.... read more: http://www.iflscience.com/plants-and-animals/weve-been-beekeeping-least-9000-years

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Amazing Time-Lapse: Bees Hatch Before Your Eyes

Witness the eerily beautiful growth of larvae into bees in this mesmerizing time-lapse video from photographer Anand Varma. Varma said the six-month project, for which he built a beehive in his workshop, gave him a new respect for the meticulous job of beekeeping.

 

Source: National Geographic

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The Crime We Commit Against Ourselves – Stop Bee Killing Pesticides

Toxic chemical companies are trying to get their banned pesticides back on UK fields.

Sign the petition to keep the ban on bee-killing pesticides. The Environmental Justice Foundation is asking people to contact Liz Truss, the UK Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, to ask her to ensure that the European vote to ban certain neonicotinoids is fully implemented and monitored by the UK Government. Source: https://speakout.38degrees.org.uk Source: http://ejfoundation.org/bees

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